Jamming on Quad Skates with @highrollazuk

west end offices to rent

To see more photos and videos from High Rollaz UK. follow @highrollazuk on Instagram.

Kay Brown, who is part of the London-based freestyle skating group High Rollaz UK (@highrollazuk ), started skating as a way to connect with his friends. “Skating was something fun that we could do every week,” he says. After finding out about a regular roller disco event in King’s Cross, he was hooked. “As we got better, we started to think about how far we could take it.”

Performing what’s also known as jam skating, Kay — who goes by Kay Boogie in the skating world — has a roster of signature moves, including what he calls the “Yoshimitsu Spin,” a really fast spin that he does low to the ground. “I named the move after a character from a PlayStation game,” he says. Another move, called “Baby by Me,” requires two skaters. “How it works is I skate up behind my colleague, go through their legs and I’m lifted up into the air and do the splits,” Kay explains.

Several musical videos have featured High Rollaz UK’s unique skating maneuvers, including the video to the modern soul duo Jungle’s song “The Heat .” During long production days, Kay shares behind-the-scenes moments on Instagram. “We share the real us,” he says. “Our followers can guarantee that anything we post is unedited and isn’t planned. We capture the moments when they happen and post them.”

Kay says the aim is to show that hard work pays off. “If we’ve inspired even one person in a day, then we’ve done a good job,” he says.

Photoset

Arts Mashing: Creating Unimagined Compositions with @csallquist

To discover more of Chris’ transformative photo mash ups, follow @csallquist on Instagram.

“I couldn’t shake the feeling that I wasn’t doing what I’m meant to do,” recalls Chris Sallquist (@csallquist ), a Seattle-based editorial director, of his life 10 years ago. A late-night experiment of warping and bending a magazine cover eventually evolved into what he calls “Arts Mashing” – a style of collaging where he mashes up photographs on his smartphone. Now, Chris says he finally feels like he’s doing what he’s supposed to: Making art.

Photoset

Weekend Hashtag Project: #WHPppaann

Weekend Hashtag Project is a series featuring designated themes and hashtags chosen by Instagram’s Community Team. For a chance to be featured on the Instagram blog, follow @instagram and look for a post announcing the weekend’s project every Friday.

This weekend’s hashtag project takes its inspiration from the #ppaann hashtag that started on the streets of New York. According to Brooklyn Instagrammer Matthew Ferri (@matthewferri ), the hashtag’s creator, “I’ve always been drawn to visuals that evoke a rush of energy and emotion. When I was learning photography, I used to see a lot of panning shots around the internet and always wondered how they were achieved.”

With that in mind, the goal this weekend is to capture creative photos that employ a panning technique to convey motion. Here are some of Matthew’s tips to get you started:

  • “For starters, you’re going to want to find a subject that is moving fast (a car, bike, skier/snowboarder, runner, etc). Check your surroundings—what would make for a good background? Try to find some lights or variations in colors, as they’ll end up being blurred, creating an abstract backdrop.”
  • “Using the native camera app, you’ll want to follow your subject as they pass you. If you’re standing on a street corner and a car is approaching you, aim the camera at the car and follow it while pressing the shutter button. Don’t stop following the subject until a second or two after you’ve pressed it.”
  • “Don’t be afraid of failure. Pans may take a lot of of attempts to get right (I’ve taken hundreds, if not thousands), so keep at it and have fun!”

PROJECT RULES: Please add the #WHPppaann hashtag only to photos taken over this weekend and only submit your own photographs to the project. Any tagged image taken over the weekend is eligible to be featured Monday morning.

Photoset

Celebrating a Cuddly Lizard Community with #beardiesofinstagram

For more bearded dragons with big personalities, explore the #beardiesofinstagram hashtag.

With a name like “bearded dragon,” it’s hard to conjure up images of a friendly and adorable pet. But one look at Pringle (@super_pringle ), a lovable lizard owned by 24-year-old Melbourne student Sophie Hayes, should be enough to change anyone’s mind.

Pringle was a present from Sophie’s mother, and though she says the lizard can be a handful at times, he’s usually calm — and even cuddly.

“Most people who hold or touch him for the first time are usually surprised at how soft he is,” Sophie says. “I think many people don’t see lizards as animals you can cuddle up to, but I love watching TV with Pringle curled up on my lap or chest.”

Though you can’t expect bearded dragons to come when called like a dog, Sophie insists they are equally rewarding pets. “They do a lot of funny things,” she says. “Sometimes they can sit still and hardly move all day, while other

days, they will be running around the house non-stop.”

Plus, they don’t mind being dressed up. Sophie is always on the lookout for props that will accentuate Pringle’s personality in her Instagram photos. “I recently went on a trip to the UK and bought him new props everywhere from the Tower of London to the Roman Baths,” she says. “I basically just let whichever props I find inspire the next photo I will take.”

Photoset

The Art of Technological Innovation with @maasmuseum

For more from MAAS’s vibrant collection in Sydney, follow @maasmuseum on Instagram.

From winged sneakers to robot dogs, Australia’s Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences (@maasmuseum ) houses a delightfully diverse range of pieces.

“Every object in the collection, regardless of its purpose, is a product of technology, and every object is an expression of our values and beliefs,” says the museum’s media production manager, Paula Bray. “Art and technology are intimately entwined, inside and outside the museum.”

The MAAS Instagram account shares highlights from their exhibits — which span history, science, design, music and space exploration, among other themes — as well as behind-the-scenes content from the installations. But ultimately the goal of their images is to bring to life the rich experience of visiting a local museum, wherever that may be for the viewer.

“The MAAS museum is home to stories of Australian culture,” says Paula. “Your museum can play a part in each stage of your life. Learn to love your local museum.”

Photoset

Wishes for Flowers with @polina_che

For more photographs of Polina’s floral arrangements, follow @polina_che on Instagram.

For the Moscow florist Polina Chentsova (@polina_che ), working with flowers is a chance to create something new and interesting out of something she loves. “It’s very nice when my customers buy flowers for their loves or moms,” she says. “It’s so cute how they care and describe in detail their wishes.”

Photoset

Capturing Climbing History on the Dawn Wall with @coreyrichproductions

For more photos from the Dawn Wall free climb, follow photographer Corey Rich (@coreyrichproductions ) and climbers Tommy Caldwell (@tommycaldwell ) and Kevin Jorgeson (@kjorgeson ) on Instagram.

“It’s very rare in life that you get to witness people really pushing it to the limit, and to have a front seat,” says adventure photographer Corey Rich (@coreyrichproductions ). For the past three weeks, he’s been hanging thousands of feet over the floor of California’s Yosemite Valley, documenting pro climbers Tommy Caldwell (@tommycaldwell ) and Kevin Jorgeson (@kjorgeson ) as they’ve made their way up the granite face of El Capitan’s Dawn Wall. Using ropes only for safety, the pair made history this week by charting and completing a route that is widely considered the most difficult climb ever attempted.

Tommy has been attempting the climb for the past six years, and Kevin joined him in 2009. Corey began documenting the quest up the Dawn Wall when the project first began, and over time they’ve all become close friends. “There’s something special about photographing the people you really care about and traveling and surfing and suffering and sitting on planes, trains, and automobiles together for weeks on end,” Corey explains. “It makes you close, and there’s overlap in our lifestyles and passions. That’s pretty unique.”

Even though the feat is complete, Corey stresses that the spirit of adventure extends beyond the face of the cliff. “I think if people take one thing away from this, it’s find adventure in your life,” he says. “It’s about unknown outcome, taking calculated risks and trying to make something beautiful out of that. Enjoy that experience, enjoy the ride.”

Photoset

From Digital to 3-Dimensional with @jameskerestes

To see more explorations of design and architecture from James and his students, follow @jameskerestes on Instagram.

“It is important for my work, and for my students’ work, that we explore all technologies past what we believe they are intended for,” says James Kerestes (@jameskerestes ), an architect currently teaching at Ball State University in Indiana. James’ use of a 3-D printer — and other technologies normally foreign to architecture — is central both to his research and his teaching curriculum. “3-D printing has really expanded my capabilities for exploration within design,” he explains. “I see technologies such as rapid prototyping as a way of complementing my current tool sets and opening up opportunities for discovering new ones.”

While James’ current work is finding unconventional applications of the 3-D printer, he emphasizes that it’s just the latest chapter in his evolving approach to architecture and design: “It’s important to ‘break’ a tool beyond its capabilities to a point where you are ready to introduce yet another tool into the set.”

Photoset

Experiencing a Mystical Environment in Romania with @tamasdezso

To explore more of Tamas’ photographs from Romania, follow @tamasdezso on Instagram.

“The freedom of the profession attracted me,” says Tamas Dezso (@tamasdezso ), speaking of his early years as a newspaper photographer in his native Hungary. “I started as a photojournalist with a political daily and later worked for magazines. However, in a few years, I felt it constricting. I decided to concentrate on my own independent works in order to express some more complex ideas, mainly examining the transition period in Eastern Europe.”

Source: blog.instagram.com
Category: Office rental

Similar articles: